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Flea removal, treatment & prevention

At a glance

Learn all about pruritus or “itchiness” in dogs and cats.

Flea Treatment for Dogs & Cats

Flea Allergy Dermatitis is one of the most common causes of pruritus or “itchiness” in dogs and cats1. Flea bites expose pets to flea saliva – which some pets become allergic to over time – resulting in Flea Allergy Dermatitis or FAD.

FAD is an allergic skin condition that mostly affects pets aged over 1 year and commonly occurs in dogs and cats with underlying skin diseases like atopic dermatitis1,2 Pets with FAD can damage their skin by constantly scratching, nibbling or licking, and this damage can lead to secondary infection.

What does FAD look like?

The most common sign of FAD in dogs and cats is intense itchiness but there are others.Look out for the following symptoms and behaviours in your pet to help spot FAD:

It's also important to look out for damage to your pet’s skin that can lead to secondary bacterial or fungal infections (reddened, moist areas called “hot spots”) that will exacerbate the itching.1,2


What to do if you think your pet has FAD

We understand you don’t want your pet to suffer. So if you do suspect Flea Allergy Dermatitis, take your pet to your vet – they will look for evidence of fleas and may perform an insect elimination trial, skin tests or blood tests on your pet.

Did you know adult females fleas begin laying eggs 36-48 hours after they start feeding on your pet’s blood? Did you know a single flea can bite up to 400 times a day? Did you know 1 female can lay up to 50 eggs per day and 10 adult fleas can become an infestation of 250,000 in 30 days?

Bites from just one flea can be enough to trigger intense itching in a pet with FAD and your vet may diagnose FAD even if fleas or flea dirt (flea faeces) aren’t visible. Year-round flea control with an effective, fast-acting product to minimise the number of flea bites is the most important part of managing FAD and needs to include all pets in the household.

We understand you want the best flea protection

Treating FAD is easy with the AAA parasite protection of Advocate, Advantix or Advantage thanks to imidacloprid – the super active ingredient in The Advantage Family range. Imidacloprid:

Talk to your vet about FAD management

As well as using a fast-acting, effective flea control to minimise flea bites, your vet may also advise the following treatments to help heal your pet’s damaged skin, eliminate bacteria and alleviate the itching:

* See product label for details. References: 1. Noli, C, Foster, A and Rosenkrantz, W, Veterinary Allergy, 2013; 1st edn, Wiley Blackwell, New Jersey. 2. Miller, WH, Griffin, CE and Campbell, KL, Muller and Kirk’s Small Animal Dermatology, 2013; 7th edn, Elsevier Mosby, Missouri. 3. Mehlhorn, H, Hansen, O and Mencke, N, Comparative study on the effects of three insecticides (fipronil, imidacloprid, selamectin) on developmental stages of the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis Bouche 1835): a light and electron microscopic analysis of in vivo and in vitro experiments, Parasitology Research, 2001; 87(3): 198-207. 4.Mehlhorn, H, Mencke, N and Hansen O, Effects of imidacloprid on adult and larval stages of the flea Ctenocephalides felis after in vivo and in vitro application: a light- and electron-microscopy study, Parasitology Research, 1999; 85(8-9): 625-637.

If you have a question on anything from parasites to pet health ask us, we don't bite!


Call The Advantage Pet Care Line on 1800 678 368

Lungworm & your cat

Protect your cat from dreaded lungworm.

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If you have a question on anything from parasites to pet health ask us, we don't bite!


Call The Advantage Pet Care Line on 1800 678 368

Lungworm & your cat

- ↓ -

Protect your cat from dreaded lungworm.