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Cat grooming tips

At a glance

Cats love to groom. Give them a helping hand.

Cat Grooming Tips

We understand cats are naturally clean creatures and will spend hours pulling out knots, licking and grooming themselves.

If you’ve ever seen this rigorous process you’ll know cats take great pride in their appearance and it’s a big job that can sometimes use a little help – that’s where the following information will come in handy.

The importance of grooming

What grooming does my cat need?

Not every cat needs every type of grooming but all cats will benefit from brushing and nail trimming, while some cats may need clipping and bathing.

Making the most out of pamper sessions

Getting started

Cats are generally less tolerant of grooming than dogs, so be gentle and take things slowly so your cat learns to enjoy pampering now and into the future.

How often your cat requires grooming will depend on their coat, state of health and lifestyle:


Brushing your cat

Whether your cat has long, medium or short hair will influence the type of brush they’ll need – ask your pet health professional for advice on choosing the right brush.

Be careful when grooming with sharp objects like scissors and clippers – professional grooming offered by vet clinics or groomers is a good alternative option.

Up close and personal

The grooming process is a good time to take a closer look at your cat’s skin and ears. External parasites such as fleas, ticks and mites can cause discomfort or itchiness, and even transfer disease or other parasites like tapeworm.

Start by running your fingers through your cat’s coat, feeling their skin for anything unusual – look further by parting the coat for signs of sores, rashes, bald spots, dry or flaky skin, redness and parasites.

Checking your cat’s ears

Also look out for the following changes:

Has your cat’s coat lost its shine?

A dull coat or dry and flaky skin may be caused by arthritis or age, poor diet, allergies, weight problems, skin infections, diabetes or hyperthyroidism, or parasites.

If you notice any changes in the appearance of your cat’s skin or coat, or you are concerned about their ears, talk to your vet.

Should you bathe your cat?

We understand that something as simple as being outside in the mud and rain can turn your cat or kitten into a moggy mess. While many cats enjoy playing with running taps or wet shower floors, they don’t all like to be bathed.

Fortunately, many cats will only ever need a bath if their coat becomes very dirty, if they’re not able to groom themselves or if they have a skin disease that requires medicated shampoo.

If bathing is started at a young age and is a positive experience, many cats will tolerate being bathed.

How to bathe your cat

Before you start, ensure you have everything you need including someone to help you hold your cat:

A warm, wet face washer is a great alternative to a bath. Place the washer in the palm of your hand and gently wipe it across the coat of your cat – most cats will tolerate this as it’s a similar sensation to being groomed by another cat.

Got a pet health question?

If you have a question on anything from parasites to pet health, ask us we don't bite!

Call The Advantage Pet Care Line on 1800 678 368.

Profender spot-on for cats

Profender is the only spot-on that kills all infective stages of intestinal worms and is now also registered for the control of lungworm in cats.
Treats
Worms

The Senior Cat

Help your cat age gracefully.

- ↓ -
Got a pet health question?

If you have a question on anything from parasites to pet health, ask us we don't bite!

Call The Advantage Pet Care Line on 1800 678 368.

Profender spot-on for cats

Profender is the only spot-on that kills all infective stages of intestinal worms and is now also registered for the control of lungworm in cats. Treats
Worms

The Senior Cat

- ↓ -

Help your cat age gracefully.